Healthy Environment, Strong Communities, Accountable Government


Municipal Clean Energy Action Plans

February 6, 2007 - Neighborhood Network Research Director, Andrew Manitt appointed to Brookhaven Town Clean Energy Task Force.

The Town of Brookhaven's Clean Energy Task Force, which was established as one of the goals of Brookhaven's 2006 Clean Energy Action Plan, is charged with reviewing of the Town's energy efficiency and renewable energy efforts, and helping to set the direction for new initiatives and policies to promote wise energy use.

October 14, 2005 - Nasssau County Executive Tom Suozzi announces Clean Energy Action Plan for Nassau.

Click here to download a pdf of the plan.

March 4, 2005 - Suffolk County Executive Steve Levy announces Clean Energy Action Plan for County.

Neighborhood Network Executive Director Neal Lewis, Suffolk County Executive Steve Levy, Renewable Energy Long Island Executive Director Gordian Raacke, and Neighborhood Network V.P. for Government Affairs Chris O'Connor at a press conference announcing Suffolk's 2005 Clean Energy Action Plan

March 22, 2005 - Town of Oyster Bay becomes first Long Island Town to adopt a clean energy action plan.

April 26, 2005 - Town of Southampton adopts a clean energy action plan.

May 11, 2005 - Town of Babylon announces its comprehensive clean energy action plan.

August 31, 2005 - Town of Huntington adopts clean energy action plan

Neighborhood Network Issues Program Coordinator Beth Fiteni, Babylon Supervisor Steve Bellone, and Neighborhood Network Executive Director Neal Lewis standing next to Babylon Town's first hybrid-electric vehicle, a Ford Hybrid Escape SUV.

Energy Action Plan Summaries
Suffolk County
  1. Analyze data for energy conservation & efficiencies
  2. Perform energy audits
  3. Undertake Energy efficiency projects
    • SCPD Headquarters
    • Medical examiners building
    • Citi Park
    • Farmingville Health center
    • Sewage Treatment Plants
  4. Adopt easily implemented technologies
    • Light pollution reduction at 6th district court
  5. Develop Policy on alternative fuel vehicles
    • Pilot bio-diesel fuel program at bergen point
    • 4 hybrid buses to replace diesel
    • 59 clean diesel technology buses which reduce emissions 85%
    • Ultra low sulfur diesel fuel
  6. Install solar panels
    • Police headquarters
  7. Purchase energy star office equipment
  8. Use green building practices
  9. Meet regularly with LIPA, NYPA, & Keyspan
  10. Participate in the Clean Energy Leadership Task Force
Nassau County
  1. USE ALTERNATIVE FUEL VEHICLES
    • Alternative Fuel Vehicle Program
    • Green Fuels Filling Stations
    • LI Bus Compressed Natural Gas Fleet
    • Diesel Emissions Reduction Programs
    • Vehicle Idling Reduction Measures
  2. REDUCE AUTOMOBILE USE AND
    TRAFFIC CONGESTION
    • Travel Demand Management
    • Traffic Signal Coordination
    • Roadway Improvements
    • Traffic Incident Management
  3. AGGRESSIVELY CONSERVE ENERGY
    • Completed Energy Conservation Projects
    • In-Progress Energy Conservation Projects
    • Planned Energy Conservation Projects
  4. EFFECTIVELY MANAGE ENERGY USE
    • Electric Bill Consolidation & Reporting System
    • Retrofit Energy and Capacity Program
    • Utility Expense Reduction Services Contract
    • Energy Coordinator
  5. EXPAND RENEWABLE ENERGY USE
    • Green Power Purchases
    • Digester Gas Use in County Power Plants
    • Clean Energy Research and Development
    • Alternative Energy Demonstration Center
    • LIPA Offshore Wind Energy Park
  6. FOSTER SMART GROWTH
    • The Nassau Hub
    • Planning Federation
    • Transit-Oriented, Mixed-Use Development
    • Open Space Preservation to Encourage Infill
    • Trailways and Bike Paths
Oyster Bay
  1. The Town Green Energy Task Force will continue assessing the Town's use of green energy sources and the incorporation into the daily operation of the Town of:
    • use of energy star products in Town construction projects
    • alternative fuel vehicles
    • solar and wind power at Town facilities.
  2. The Town Green Energy Task Force will continue meeting with energy agencies and authorities to keep abreast of various options for assessing the energy we now use, the alternatives available, and the sources of technical and financial assistance that are available to us.
Southampton
  1. LIPA energy audits of Town Hall and Town Police Station.
  2. LIPA review of new systems prior to purchase.
  3. LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certified agency hired to assist development of Town Facilities Management Master Plan.
  4. Fuel efficient vehicle purchased as pool vehicle, review of specifications of all new vehicles required to identify potential comparable alternative fuel vehicles.
Babylon
  1. Purchase of hybrid-electric vehicles, including a Ford Hybrid Escape SUV for the fire marshal and 4 Toyota Priuses for town inspectors
  2. Conversion to the use of 20% bio-diesel fuel for the Town's entire fleet of diesel trucks and heavy equipment
  3. Purchase of 10% of the Town's electricity from wind generation
  4. Installation of solar photovoltaic panels on both the Town Hall and the Town Hall Annex
Huntington
  1. Office equipment - establish a policy of turning off all PCs, monitors, printers, scanners, etc. each night; turning off copiers rather than leaving them in energy saver mode; and turning off other office equipment.
  2. Lighting - turn off lights in unoccupied areas and those with sufficient natural light; open blinds in cooler weather to use natural light.
  3. Heating and cooling - use fans in summer to circulate air; close blinds in summer to prevent heating from sun; encourage staff to wear lighter clothing in summer, and keep a sweater or jacket on hand in cooler weather; Department heads are to check thermostats periodically to ensure proper settings.
  4. Cars and light-duty vehicles - avoid high speed and rapid acceleration, do not idle unecessarily (more than one idling minute uses more fuel than starting a vehicle); use cruise control and overdrive when possible; check tire pressure regularly; keep engines tuned.
  5. Department heads are directed to provide the Supervisor's office with proposals for individual department energy saving proposals.
East Hampton
  1. Continue to participate in the Clean Energy Leadership Task Force's quarterly meetings and to continue being informed about clean energy technologies and financial incentives available to municipalities.
  2. Create an internal energy task force, to collect data and analyze the possibilities, within a given timeline for action.
  3. Identify municipal facilities to target for energy audits.
  4. Meet with LIPA and discuss their commercial construction program for building retrofits.
  5. Meet with NY Power Authority and discuss their financing program for building retrofits.
  6. Select a priority energy efficiency project involving one major facility which incorporates a comprehensive set of clean energy technologies. (For example, retrofitting with energy efficient lighting fixtures and windows, a geothermal heating and cooling system, etc.)
  7. Adopt one (or a few) easily implemented technologies across many facilities. (For example, changing "exit" light
    fixtures to energy efficient LED light bulbs in several municipal buildings.)
  8. Create a policy to phase in alternative fuel (e.g. natural gas, biodiesel, etc.) and/or hybrid vehicles into the municipal vehicle fleet.
  9. Evaluate which municipal facility might be better suited for an installation of solar panels and prepare applications for funding of a solar project.
  10. Pass an Executive Order making energy efficient work place practices a mandate. This would include motion sensors, turning off computers at night, etc.
  11. Adopt a policy of purchasing Energy Star rated office equipment.
  12. Encourage green building practices for all new construction and major renovations.
  13. Purchase "Green Power" through the GREEN CHOICES program.
Brookhaven
  1. Continue to participate in the Clean Energy Leadership Task Force's quarterly meetings and to continue being informed about clean energy technologies and financial incentives available to municipalities.
  2. Create an internal energy task force, to collect data and analyze the possibilities, within a given timeline for action.
  3. Identify municipal facilities to target for energy audits.
  4. Meet with LIPA and discuss their commercial construction program for building retrofits.
  5. Meet with NY Power Authority and discuss their financing program for building retrofits.
  6. Select a priority energy efficiency project involving one major facility which incorporates a comprehensive set of clean energy technologies. (For example, retrofitting with energy efficient lighting fixtures and windows, a geothermal heating and cooling system, etc.)
  7. Adopt one (or a few) easily implemented technologies across many facilities. (For example, changing "exit" light
    fixtures to energy efficient LED light bulbs in several municipal buildings.)
  8. Create a policy to phase in alternative fuel (e.g. natural gas, biodiesel, etc.) and/or hybrid vehicles into the municipal vehicle fleet.
  9. Evaluate which municipal facility might be better suited for an installation of solar panels and prepare applications for funding of a solar project.
  10. Pass an Executive Order making energy efficient work place practices a mandate. This would include motion sensors, turning off computers at night, etc.
  11. Adopt a policy of purchasing Energy Star rated office equipment.
  12. Encourage green building practices for all new construction and major renovations.
Riverhead

The Town of Riverhead adopts the following set of goals for 2006:

  1. To continue to keep informed about clean energy technologies and financial incentives available to municipalities.
  2. To assign a committee/individual to collect data and analyze the possibilities within a given timeline for action.
  3. To identify municipal facilities to target for energy audits.
  4. To meet with LIPA and discuss their commercial construction program for building retrofits.
  5. To select a priority energy efficiency project involving one major facility, which incorporates a comprehensive set of clean energy technologies. (For example, retrofitting the Town Hall with energy efficient lighting fixtures and windows, a geothermal heating and cooling system, etc.)
  6. To adopt one (or a few) easily implemented technologies across many facilities. (For example, changing "exit" light fixtures to energy efficient LED light bulbs in several municipal buildings.) ;
  7. To create a policy to phase in alternative fuel (e.g. natural gas, biodiesel, etc.) and/or hybrid vehicles into the municipal vehicle fleet.
  8. To evaluate which municipal facility might be best suited for an installation of solar panels and prepare applications for funding of a solar project.
  9. To pass a directive making energy efficient workplace practices a mandate. This would include motion sensors, turning off computers at night, etc.
  10. To explore green building practices for all new construction and major renovations.

Download pdf of model Clean Energy Action Plan

Download pdf of model Clean Energy Resolution


A prime focus for the Clean Energy Leadership Task Force for 2005 is to help Long Island municipalities to develop, and encourage them to adopt Clean Energy Action Plans. The Action Plans should set out clear goals and guidelines for the municipality's progress in the coming year toward cleaner, more efficient energy use.

Clean Energy Action Plans could set goals such as proposed major retrofits of one or more existing buildings, acquisition of alternative fuel vehicles, the development new facility management and work policies to save energy, or even the formation of a committed to study current energy use and develop recommendation for improvements.

The table below shows some of the strategies for developing a Clean Energy Action Plan.

Developing a Clean Energy Action Plan
Adopting Policy & Taking Specific Actions
Strategy
Examples

Pros

Cons

Specific Clean Energy Policy Adopt a policy similar to Governor's Executive Order 111
  • Comprehensive & phases in over time
  • Supported by the Governor
 
Adopt one or a few easily implemented technologies/policies across many facilities

Technology & Procurement: Efficient lighting, energy star replacement for all inefficient equipment; silver reflecting roofs, tinting windows, etc.

Work Procedures/Policy: conservation policy including turning off computers at night, motion sensors

  • Potentially high yield payback with quick results
  • Could generate support for more energy saving technology
  • All municipal staff are benefited so other staff doesn't feel like "just town hall gets everything new"
  • The next technology you choose you may not get the same payback-- diminishing returns in cost/benefit
  • Contractor has to travel to many locations.
  • Staff must adapt to new work procedures
Choose one (or more) facilities to "re-do" with a Major building retrofit using multiple technologies/policies, for example, Town Hall.

Technology & Procurement: Heating &cooling systems (HVAC) including geothermal; efficient lighting & energy star equipment; variable speed drives; and other major energy users.

Policy: set policy for any new construction or renovation to follow green building standards

  • There is one center that demonstrates many positive items to members of the public
  • Provides a media-worthy location to draw attention to issues on larger scale
  • Not at all municipal facilities, so public may not see new technologies unless they visit that one location.
Renewable/alternative power generation

Technology & Procurement: Solar panels, wind turbines, fuel cells

Policy: LIPA Green Choice program

  • high publicity appeal & demonstration of these technologies for the public
  • potential for back-up power in power failure for vital services
More costly than efficiency upgrade
Fleets

Technology: natural gas, hybrid, biodiesel, or electric

Policy: Create policy for all newly purchased vehicles be alternative fuel/the most fuel efficient technology when replacing vehicles. Assessment of needs & cutting back on # of vehicles where appropriate.

  • Savings from fuel efficiency
  • Highly visible to the public; shows Town is attempting to conserve money & protect environment
  • More expensive and are subject to rebates for incremental costs
  • Staff must adjust to new technology
Process
Strategy
Examples
Pros
Cons
One elected official takes the lead, to make sure efforts are carried out to implement energy efficiency steps & to gain support of the whole board/legislature Town of Smithtown or County of Suffolk
  • Decisions are made high up so there's no problem of a lower level staff person doing all the work but then not having authority to follow through
  • Less direct input from DPW staff or equivalent who have more expertise in carrying out the tasks & knowing what's feasible
Town or County appoints a staff person (or create position) to be the primary contact person on these issues Town of Huntington or Town of Brookhaven or Town of East Hampton
  • Shows dedication to the issue so that the tasks are not just put by the wayside by people who already juggle many tasks
  • Assigns responsibility so anyone who has a question on these issues, including the energy authorities or contractors (NYPA, LIPA, etc.), knows who to contact.
Elected officials may not follow the recommendation of the staff person after significant staff time is devoted to researching the issues.
Town or County creates an advisory committee to the executive within the municipality, ideally including at least one environmental activist in addition to municipal staff & experts Town of Oyster Bay or Town of East Hampton or Suffolk County Energy Advisory Committee
  • Keeps attention on issues; more ideas can be shared. An elected official can also be part of this committee.
  • Concerns over applying new technologies and details about costs are looked at in an open process
  • Group can help develop community awareness.
  • Free expertise of committee members
  • Many affected parties involved can support the effort from early-on.
  • Important to select right people for committee to avoid conflict and waste of time.
  • Lots of ideas can be generated, but little action taken depending on how chairperson runs meetings
NOTE: Each town is different with unique circumstances so will have different approaches. Note that a town/county may also choose more than one option or a combination thereof.

 

Neighborhood Network
7180 Republic Airport, East Farmingdale, NY 11735 Tel: (631) 963-5454
Advocates for Long Island's Environment