Healthy Environment, Strong Communities, Accountable Government

Expand the "Bottle Bill"

Efforts to include non-carbonated beverages in 5¢ can and bottle deposit law

The Neighborhood Network is working with a coalition of environmental groups to expand the existing New York State deposit bottle law to include non-carbonated beverages such as bottled water, iced tea, juices, and sports drinks. Currently State Law covers only carbonated drinks (beer and soda). Bills have been introduced in the State Senate and Assembly, as well as the Suffolk County Legislature, that would put a deposit on non-carbonated beverage containers.

The original "bottle bill" has been an overwhelming environmental success, greatly reducing litter in New York State. When it was adopted in the 1980s, non-carbonated soft drinks were a miniscule portion of the beverage market, now they account for more than 22% of all bottled and canned drinks sold. As a result, these non-redeemable beverage containers are becoming an increasing source of litter in our communities. Including them in the deposit law would reduce litter and increase recycling rates.

  • It takes the same amount of energy to make one can from virgin materials as it does to make four cans from recycled cans.
  • Aluminum cans are recycled at rates above 80% in states with deposit laws.
  • The energy saved from recycling a glass bottle will light a 100-watt bulb for four hours.
  • Glass produced from recycled glass instead of raw material reduces related air pollution by 20 percent and water pollution by 50 percent.
  • Recycling 1 ton of plastic saves the equivalent of 1,000-2,000 gallons of gasoline.

The proposed expanded bottle bills would exempt wine, liquor, and milk.

Call, write or email your State Assembly Member and State Senator today. Tell them that you support the bigger, better bottle bill (A.2517d/S.1290 sponsored by Assemblyman Thomas DiNapoli and Senator Kenneth LaValle, respectively.)

Neighborhood Network
7180 Republic Airport, East Farmingdale, NY 11735 Tel: (631) 963-5454
Advocates for Long Island's Environment